Posts Tagged ‘playwrights’

2017 ZeBBie Awards Nominees

5th May 2017 by Maura McHugh

The Writers Guild of Ireland is delighted to announce the nominees for the 2017 ZeBBie Awards:

Best Television Script

  • Sharon Horgan for Divorce (Pilot ep.)
  • Graham Linehan & Sharon Horgan for Motherland (Pilot ep.)
  • Stefanie Preissner for Can’t Cope Won’t Cope (Ep. 4)

Best Radio Script

  • Lucy Caldwell for Dear Baby Mine (Ep. 1)
  • Rory Duffy for Paulo in the Underworld
  • Kate Gilmore for The Wickedness of Oz

Best Theatre Script

  • David Ireland for Cyprus Avenue
  • Margaret McAuliffe for The Humours of Bandon
  • Laurence McKeown for Green & Blue

Best Feature Film Script

  • Emma Donoghue for Room
  • Peter Foott for The Young Offenders
  • Darren Thornton & Colin Thornton for A Date for Mad Mary

Best Short Film Script

  • Graham Cantwell for Lily
  • Emmet Kirwan for Heartbreak
  • Natasha Waugh for Terminal

Best Game Script

  • Kevin Beimers for Wailing Heights
  • Christopher Conlan for The Little Acre
  • Barry Keating for Steep

Congratulations to all the nominees!

ZeBBie Awards Ceremony

The 2017 ZeBBie Awards Ceremony will take place on Wednesday, 28 June 2017 in The Sugar Club, 8 Lower Leeson Street, Dublin 2, and it will be hosted by Senator David Norris.

Doors open at 7.30 pm, and the ceremonies begin at 8.00 pm.

The ceremony is free to fully paid up members of the Guild.

Dress Code: writer chic.

Voting

Voting is now open and Guild members should have received an email with details on how to vote.

Voting closes at 3pm on Monday, 22 May 2017.

About the ZeBBie Awards

The ZeBBie Awards are annual awards created by the WGI — named in honour of O. Z. Whitehead — to acknowledge the best script(s) written by Irish playwrights and screenwriters during the previous year.

#WakingtheFeminists Videos Online

16th November 2015 by Maura McHugh

IFB on Gender Equality in Irish Film

13th November 2015 by Maura McHugh

On Thursday, November 12 the #WakingtheFeminists meeting took place in a packed Abbey Theatre. Chaired by Senator Ivana Bacik, the meeting featured thirty women theatremakers talking about their experiences getting work made (or not made) in Ireland, along with a number of contributors from the audience, and an assurance from the director of the Abbey, Fiach Mac Conghail, that action will be taken to address gender imbalance in future programmes.

The Irish Theatre Institute also released information “on the Irish new play repertoire, illustrating the number of new Irish plays by women presented in the period 2000-2014 and highlighting the statistics for the Abbey Theatre (main stage and Peacock stage).”

On the same afternoon the Irish Film Board released a statement about Gender Equality in Irish Film

Bord Scannán na hÉireann/ the Irish Film Board recognises and accepts that major underrepresentation of women exists in Irish film. The IFB acknowledges that there are many talented women writers, producers, directors, cinematographers, editors, actors, animators and designers out there that are not fully represented either in terms of accessing funding for film or in public recognition of their talent.

Gender inequality is an area of major concern to current board members and has been the subject of discussion at our recent meetings and in a number of external fora, including at the Galway Film Fleadh in July 2015. The IFB is currently developing a new strategy which will declare its strong and heartfelt commitment to gender equality and diversity as a strategic priority.

Dr. Annie Doona, Acting Chair of the Irish Film Board commented “We recognise that words are not enough; actions are needed to address the gender inequality issue. The IFB is concerned enough to act and indeed to take a lead on this issue. Members of the current IFB board are active members of the recently formed Women in Film and Television Ireland and as Acting Chair of the IFB I have been in contact with that organisation to look at what action we can take together to raise the representation of women in film in Ireland”.

The IFB has also engaged in particular with the Writers Guild of Ireland and the Screen Directors Guild of Ireland on this issue and will be continuing to work with them and with the other representative organisations in Irish film. The IFB has been working with the Eurimages Council of Europe co-production fund which has recently adopted a detailed strategy on gender equality in the European film industry.

Dr. Doona continued: “The issue of funding for women filmmakers is an important one. The Irish Film Board is finalising detailed statistics in relation to gender equality in Irish film; it is important to gather and publish this information but we know what the statistics are likely to tell us. The next step is to actively discuss the best way forward in terms of positive action to redress the imbalance including the issue of access to IFB funding. We will be in a position to announce details of a range of actions around gender inequality we are proposing to take in December”.

The IFB will also be taking this issue up with fellow public funders in Irish film including the public service broadcasters (RTÉ and TG4) and the BAI Sound and Vision Fund. It is only by the IFB taking a lead and working in partnership with others that we can find ways to address the gender inequality issue. The IFB welcomes the opportunity to be a key player in addressing gender inequality in the Irish film industry.

It is hoped that these commitments to change will be followed up by significant action to adjust the current imbalance of representation in Irish theatre and film.

#WakingtheFeminists

11th November 2015 by Maura McHugh

On Wednesday, 28 October the Abbey Theatre launched its programme, termed Waking the Nation, to mark the centenary of the 1916 Rising.

In The Irish Times on Monday, 2 November journalist Una Mullally pointed out that 9 out of the 10 plays in the 2016 programme are written by men, with a lone contribution by a woman playwright.

She said:

“Gender equality in Ireland’s artistic institutions is not about tokenism, it is about redressing a historical imbalance, it is about representing the population, it is about showcasing multiple perspectives not just a male ones, it is about reflecting the whole audience and not just a part of it. If art is about how we see ourselves, then why are we only getting one half of the picture? The Abbey Theatre receives taxpayers’ money, which does not discriminate on the basis of gender, yet most of the work it shows is by men. Why? If there is such a dearth of female-made theatre, what is it doing to address this? Are there female mentorship schemes? Female commissioning schemes?”

On Wednesday, 4 November Dr Brenda Donohue wrote a letter to the Editor of The Irish Times detailing highlights of the research she has conducted into the number of women playwrights whose work has been produced for the Abbey.

“Some of my latest research, which is due to be published in 2016, has focused on the number of plays written by women and presented on the Abbey stages from 1995 to 2014. It found that of 320 plays staged in this period, just 36 plays were written by a woman, 24 of which were new plays, while 12 were revivals.

My analysis shows that women playwrights are significantly under-represented on the Abbey and Peacock stages in terms of full theatrical productions. In the selected period, the annual percentage of plays written by women produced on either the Abbey or Peacock stages varied from a low of zero per cent of the plays produced in 2008, to a high of 26.6 per cent in 2003.

On average, over the period studied, just 11 per cent of the plays staged by the National Theatre were written by a woman.

One new play written by a woman is produced, on average, at the Abbey every year. In addition, the revival of plays by women is rare, with on average less than one revived work written by a woman staged per year in the selected period, accounting for a meagre 7 per cent of plays revived. In many years no revived works by women were produced. The issue of a low number of revivals is particularly pertinent to the current discussion.”

This prompted a conversation initially on Twitter called #WakingtheFeminists (also at @WTFeminists and wakingthefeminists.wordpress.com), which has turned into a grassroots campaign by Irish artists to challenge the under-representation of the work of women at the Abbey Theatre, and in Irish theatre generally.

There is now an online petition asking for equality for women artists, which anyone can sign to show their support for the campaign.

On 9 November the Board and the Director of the Abbey Theatre released a statement and acknowledged that the 2016 programme did not represent gender equality.

The Board commits to work with the Director and the new incoming Directors to develop a comprehensive policy and detailed plan to help address gender equality with the cooperation and input of the wider Irish theatre community.

There is going to be a #WakingTheFeminists public meeting at the Abbey Theatre tomorrow – Thursday, 12 November – but tickets to the event sold out within ten minutes of being released. There will be a standby list at the theatre from noon tomorrow, although demand is expected to be exceptional.

At 12.15pm sharp there will be a photo opportunity outside the Abbey Theatre for women working in all areas of theatre in Ireland. They welcome writers, directors, actors, stage managers, set designers, producers, costume designers, managers, lighting designers, administrators, sound designers, technical, and production managers to attend. If you’re unable to get a ticket for the meeting, you’re very welcome to attend the photo op.

For those who come to the photo op but can’t get into the meeting the Project Arts Centre welcomes them to continue the conversation in its bar and cafe.

If you cannot attend either event, you should be able to follow the discussion online – with information on how to do so on the website.

Dr Susan Liddy also contributed to the conversation in relation to the representation of women in the film industry by way of a letter to The Irish Times, which you can read here.

On Winning a ZeBBie: Joe O’Byrne

13th May 2015 by Maura McHugh

In 2012, Joe took home the ZeBBie Award for Best Radio Script for his work entitled The Blue Hyacinth.

“The ZeBBies is a great event, as it is the one forum for celebrating the work of writers in Ireland,” Joe said. “Through the process of organising the awards and the event it is also a great resource as it is the most systematic tool for gathering information about who is writing and what is being written across a number of media.”

Centered around Hubert and Rose Derdon, this story depicts the struggle of a married man when he is unable to grieve for his wife after she passes away. The Blue Hyacinth is a beautiful creation broaching ideas on life, death, and above all, grief.

Joe has written a number of radio plays for RTÉ which include A Snail Called Sam, What Next for Hedy Lamarr, and Crash Course on Earth. He has also written and directed the stage play McKeague and O’Brien Present the Rising.

Aside from his work on the airwaves, Joe is also a playwright, screenwriter, and a director. He has been the artistic director of Co-motion Theatre Company and has written many of his own plays, including Departed, The Ghost of Saint Joan, and The Man in the Iron Mask, among others.

Currently, Joe is writing a number of episodes of the TV series Rare Earth. Additionally, he is working on a feature film called Killing Mammy.