Posts Tagged ‘digital media’

Writing Digital Fiction

9th November 2010

FAS Screen Training IrelandFÁS Screen Training Ireland is looking for applicants for a new course, Writing Digital Fiction, which is a 6-day event, spread over 3 weekends in December and January starting the 11 December 2010.

Participant Profile:
This course is aimed at writers who are interested in developing their skills in series writing specifically for online, interactive and digital media fiction.

The first module of this course will run in December and the other 2 modules in January.

Course Profile:
On this course writers will cover all stages and steps involved in project development from identification of a good idea through to full scripts. Writers will work together under the direction of experienced Head Writers Luke Hyams (Kate Modern, Dubplate Drama) and Melanie Martinez (Sophia’s Diary) to develop and write a drama series for online exploitation. The course will replicate the writer’s room experience.

Luke Hyams and Melanie Martinez will co-ordinate writing phases of projects in a “Showrunner” capacity, developing writers’ understanding of working in a professional Writer’s Room environment as well as the craft and skill of creating digital fiction projects.

Writers will work together in teams to develop outlines, treatments, series bibles and project pitches, first draft scripts, along with outlines for online character pages, micro-sites, blogs, and transmedia elements as may be appropriate for their projects.

The course will also explore the opportunities which exist for writers to develop projects which appeal to new and emerging markets for media.

The course will cover the following:

  • Team Writing, and working in the Writer’s Room
  • An understanding of the internet and transmedia storytelling
  • Finding an audience, audience identification, audience engagement
  • Concept and Idea generation
  • Recognising a saleable idea
  • The different online narrative formats
  • Ideas and the market
  • Story development, durations and demographics
  • Playing with the format, continuous narrative, episodic tags and hooks
  • Understanding genre and tone
  • Trends in Transmedia/Cross-Platform Projects
  • Writing for different platforms
  • Building an online community

Cost of the course is €200, and details on how to apply are on the web site.

Darklight Transmedia Symposium

14th October 2010

Darklight 2010On Friday 29 October, from 10am – 6pm in Filmbase, Dublin the Darklight Festival will be running a Transmedia Symposium.

Official Festival Industry Partner Irish Film Board/Bord Scannan na hEireann, producer Katie Holly and festival director Nicky Gogan put their heads together to programme a day of information, discussion, workshops and advice open to all aspiring and practicing creative folk.

This is a day-long event that will explore the potential of digital and analogue networks as a creative tool for storytelling, as well as a means to reach audiences and finance and distribute films. the international and Irish guests will discuss all aspects of Transmedia production.

Topics on the agenda include fund-raising models, distribution platforms and crowd-sourcing collectives, and we’ll also be looking at what it means to write, direct and produce projects destined for the big screen, the small screen, the internet, apps, graphic novels, live performance and immersive experiences.

The Darklight Season Pass allows access to all screenings, workshops, gigs and the symposium for the sum of €75. Season Passes are available now to purchase in person or over the phone via the IFI box-office 01 6795744. Day passes for the symposium on Friday 29 October are €40 and can be purchased online.

Evolution of Storytelling

30th September 2010

FAS Screen Training IrelandFÁS Screen Training Ireland and The Darklight Film Festival are seeking participants for The Evolution of Storytelling, which is a half-day seminar taking place in Dublin on the 30th October 2010, and costs €25.00.

Participant Profile:
Industry professionals who wish to deepen their understanding of the impact of changing technologies on the art of storytelling.

Course Profile:
Technology is impacting the art and craft of storytelling. As the industry shifts and audiences move from passive to active collaborators, how does the art of storytelling change? How does one develop stories and characters that can travel across screens and devices? What will emerge as new formats and how will they be funded and distributed? Lance Weiler, director of The Last Broadcast and Head Trauma, details the story architecture that he employs to build story worlds around his film, TV and gaming projects.

Tutor:
Lance Weiler is the Chief Story Architect of Seize the Media. He’s also a critically acclaimed award winning writer / director. Recognized as a pioneer because of the way he makes and distributes his work – Wired magazine named him “One of twenty-five people helping to re-invent entertainment and change the face of Hollywood” and Business Week recognized Lance as one of the “18 people who Changed Hollywood.” Lance has successfully self distributed his films THE LAST BROADCAST and HEAD TRAUMA to more than 20 countries while grossing over 5 million dollars in the process.

Apply online by the 15th of October 2010.

Writing Online Narrative

20th September 2010

FAS Screen Training IrelandFÁS Screen Training Ireland is running a course on Writing Online Narrative from the 2 – 3 Oct, 2010 in Dublin, and it will cost €150.

Participant Profile:
Professional Writers, Producers, Directors, Development Executives

Course Profile:
This course will aim to give participants a broad understanding of the nature of writing online drama. You Tube and other websites are a new platform for content. As audience viewing patterns are evolving markets are looking to the web to source fresh ideas. Broadcasters and the advertising industry are also looking for innovative ways that additional content can be created online and on mobile media to extend brands.

This course will explore the opportunities which exist for writers to develop projects which appeal to these developing avenues for their work.

The course will seek to inform participants about the emerging trends in online narrative and the opportunities they present to writers, producers, development executives and directors.

The course will cover the following:

  • An understanding of the internet and interactive storytelling
  • The different online narrative formats
  • Trends in Transmedia/Cross-Platform Projects
  • Finding an audience, audience identification, audience engagement
  • Story development, durations and demographics
  • Concept and Idea generation
  • Ideas and the market
  • Recognising a saleable idea
  • Writing for different platforms
  • Playing with the format, continuous narrative, episodic tags and hooks
  • Understanding genre and tone
  • Building an online community

This seminar will be followed by a Writers only module which will provide training for writers in a “Writers Room” environment for online narrative. Writers will develop and write a series suitable for online distribution in a Writers Room environment working under the direction of an experienced Head Writer (Luke Hyams, Melanie Martinez). Applications for the Writers Module will be invited following the original seminar.

The application must be processed online, and the deadline for entries is Friday the 24th of September.

Original Web Content Develops

11th August 2010

There’s an interesting article on The New York Times about how made-for-web original drama and comedy seems to be finally developing its place and market.

According to the measurement firm comScore, 86 percent of Internet users in the United States now watch at least one online video a month. Some of those shows originate on traditional TV, something that Hulu specializes in; others originate online, and that portion is growing.

“There’s an inevitability to Web video that makes it exciting,” said Rob Barnett, the chief executive of My Damn Channel, which features original comedy and music shows.

Reaffirming its belief in made-for-the-Web programming, YouTube last month announced $5 million in grants for online producers. The grants will seed new content for YouTube, a unit of Google, which has largely failed to persuade big television networks and studios to place TV episodes and films on the site. Encouraging more professional Web video is another way for YouTube to expand its inventory for advertisers.

Despite the evidence that viewers are eager to watch more on the Web, the recession was an ugly reality check for purveyors of such programming, and many start-ups were closed. At My Damn Channel, Mr. Barnett hunkered down, trimmed staff and took solace in the fact that he was seeing repeat business from his existing advertisers like Southern Comfort and HBO, even though he was struggling to add new ones. Now, he says, venture capital will allow him to hire more advertising sales staff, add business development workers and broaden the types of shows he creates.

“I often think of my daily business life as a guy running a cable network in the early 1980s,” at the dawn of that medium, Mr. Barnett said. “There is, no matter how you slice it, a timeline for any new industry to grow.”