Archive for October, 2017

Lucky Dozen: Writing for Games

25th October 2017 by Maura McHugh

With branching storylines, interactive dialogues and players’ choices to juggle, writing for games can’t help but be different from writing for TV or film. Heck, not all games have plots, but they may still need writing. Other games have story, but no dialogue. When they do show up, characters, arcs, beginnings and ends are largely still the same in games as in other media, but how you represent them to players might not be.

If you want to know more about some of the tools and techniques used in writing for games, come join us at 7 pm on Thursday, 16 November when Dave McCabe, writer of The Darkside Detective and Tavern Keeper, will open up some scripts and show you their inner-workings.

If interested, send us a blank email to the office by Tuesday, 7 November, with ‘Lucky Dozen’ in the subject line.

You know the score folks: the first twelve get the lovely plastic chairs, the wine, and the very healthy neon-orange crisps.

Writers Credits Guiding Principles

3rd October 2017 by Maura McHugh

The Writers Credits Guiding Principles were agreed between Screen Producers Ireland (SPI) and the Writers Guild of Ireland (WGI) in September 2017.

The following list of credits for writers is for guidance purposes only. The writing credit definitions mirror those of the International Affiliation of Writers Guilds.

It is important to note that the contract between the producer and the writer will take precedent over these guidelines.

We recommend that the producer and writer avail of legal advice before signing a contract.  You can also consult with the WGI/SPI.

  1. Story by
    The term “story” means an original idea written for the screen which is distinct from a screenplay and consisting of the basic narrative, idea, theme or outline indicating character development and action. A “Story by” credit is appropriate when the screenplay is based on a story, as defined above, and not based on any pre-existing material.
  2. Screen Story by
    Credit for story authorship in the form “Screen Story by” is appropriate when a story, as defined above, is based on source material though substantially new or different from the source material.
  3. Screenplay by
    A screenplay consists of individual scenes and full dialogue, together with such prior treatment, basic adaptation, continuity, scenario and dialogue as shall be used in, and substantially contributes to, the final script.

    A “Screenplay by” credit is appropriate when the screenplay is based upon a story or a screen story as defined above.

  4. Written by
    The term “Written by” is used when the writer(s) is entitled to both the “Story by” credit and the “Screenplay by” credit.

    This credit shall not be granted where there is source material of a story nature. However, biographical, newspaper and other factual sources may not necessarily deprive the writer of such credit.

  5. Narration Written by
    A “Narration Written by” credit is appropriate where the major writing contribution to a motion picture is in the form of narration. The term “narration” means material (typically off-camera) to explain or relate sequence or action (excluding promos or trailers).
  6. Based on Characters Created by
    “Based on Characters Created by” is a writing credit given to the writer(s) entitled to separated rights in a theatrical or television motion picture. This credit is accorded when a sequel to a theatrical or television motion picture is produced for television (excluding a television series).
  7. Shared credit
    When credit is accorded to a team of writers, an ampersand (&) shall be used between the writers’ names in the credit to denote a writing team. Use of the word “and” between writers’ names in a credit indicates that the writers did their work separately, one usually rewriting the other. This distinction is well established in the industry through custom and practice.
  8. The Possessory Credit
    The possessory credit “a film by” or its variations, is accorded to a director who has written and directed the film; and or who has a significant body of work and whose reputation as a film-maker is such that it can make a significant contribution to the marketing of the film. Writers’ guilds do not believe that the possessory credit should be used in any other circumstances.